Creative team building

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Creative team building

Enquire with Creative Team Building PHONE 1300 227 215

We do a lot of great work with clients around making their presentations engaging and communicating key messages in a way that engages all of the senses.  We decided to take our own advice and add some of our creative flair to a stand we had a recent conference and events Expo. It got great feedback from everyone who visited and we were delighted with how it all looked. As I always say when on my soapbox, a picture is worth 1000 words….                             To read more about it and see some pics click here...

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I have been lucky enough to share my passion of art and creativity with some fantastic companies over the last 14 years. I love seeing people tapping back into that wonderful creativity that we all have and the wonderful energy that comes from being expressive, imaginative and creative. So I was delighted when we had the opportunity to run a creative session at this years Sydney Fringe Festival for members of the public.  Whilst not a team building session, many elements were the same as the creative team building programs we run. Everyone getting out of their comfort zone. Everyone really scared about how to start and what it will look like! The first few steps are always very, very tentative.  It’s as if the paper may ignite when the pen first hits it and makes a mark. Great things start to happen when everyone feels more comfortable. It was a sold out program and we had an absolute blast.   The venue was a great space. Always a fan of a great environment to drive creativity, Fringe HQ was buzzing with stimulus. It was great to have a room full of people ready to get out of their comfort zone and to do something creative. There was plenty of fun and energy in the room. Most importantly, everyone left with something that they were proud of! The Fringe Festival gave a nice review as well  There is a tipping point when you do anything new and out of our comfort zones. There is often a voice inside  you have to deal with, telling you a bunch of crap about how unsuccessful your are going to be. The inner voice/ego/doubt we have holds us back from doing so many things. This is especially true with anything creative. Once you suck it up and go for it, the inner voice starts to quieten down then disappear completely. That’s when great things happen. I love seeing everyone leave with something they were proud of and the great smile that comes from reconnecting with your creativity. All things start with a small step, even opening up your creative potential. So, what step are you going to take to reconnect with your creativity and...

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You see so many list of what to do to be creative. In corporate land, its always about using a specific tool (invented by a consultant) to help you to think up better ideas. In creative land (where people make a living every day from doing creative stuff), the lists are different. You don’t rely on just a specific tool to keep being creative – why would you?  For me, these creative tools miss most of what it means to be creative – the act of creating itself.   To be creative, you have to create and live creatively. And the good news is that you don’t have to buy it. Designers become great designers from designing Artists become great artist through creating art Florists become great florists from constantly putting together floral creations Photographers become great photographers from constantly taking photos The more you CREATE, the more creative you become. You can then throw out the book of thinking tools you paid $60 for and is on the bookshelf in your office. This is why I really liked the Rules of a Creator’s Life from Creative Something. My favourite rules were: Try new things Always be creating Turn work into play Sounds so simple but creativity is simple. Creative people are creative because they try new things and area always creating. Who cares what is looks like at the end – just concentrate on having a good time in the process. Mistakes are OK! So what’s stopping you? Go and be creative today. It feels...

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The Creative Process: What An Artist Can Teach Us I was at an art gallery this week doing some research for a program we are running. I absolutely love spending time in galleries. I find them so inspiring not only as an artist but also for the sheer amount of self-expression that you see. We were all created with the ability and need to express ourselves (but that is another post) I came across this explanation of the inspiration of a Jeffrey Smart painting Central Station II and I thought it really summed up the creative process well. His words about the background to the painting were: “In the morning, a friend took me for a tour around those strange parts – strange architecturally – in Sydney. We went to Glebe, Annandale….. then Balmain and the houses on the water there, and Leichardt finally. By this time my imagination was stirred to such an extent that when Michael Ramsden, who drove, stopped near Central Station to run off and buy a paper, I saw him and those hoardings in such a way that I thought I should like to have it forever…it was a moment of hallucinatory beauty”. The notes for the painting went on to say ‘Returning to the spot early the next morning, Smart made a number of sketches and drawings from which he developed the final painting when he returned to Italy’  Smart stirred his creativity that day. He stirred it mightily and then most importantly, he went and acted on it. How did he stir it? He really opened his eyes to all that was around him. He thought about the world around him in a different way. We could even say his thinking/actions was out of the box (or out of the studio). He provided his mind with a whole load of stimulus and freshness. He didn’t just look at one building. He looked at loads. He moved. He didn’t restrict his stimulus to a conversation, a text book or a meeting room. He moved and engaged with his environment. All of these things stirred his imagination. Importantly, he was open to it being stirred. He was open to being inspired. He was a sponge ready to soak it all up. He then did something about it. He could have so easily not gone back in the morning. He would have had to change his plans, miss appointments etc. but he went and did it and harnessed his creative drive at the moment. For me, it sums up the creative process really well. You have to allow your imagination to be stirred. You do...

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We have a pantry door in our kitchen that has been turned into our blackboard and my 4 year and 2 year old children LOVE it. They draw on it all the time. My oldest son recently asked me to show him how to draw a pear so he could learn how to do it. I drew the pear, he then drew a pear and then coloured in the one that I drew. Both pictures are still on the blackboard and I have been studying his colouring in. From an artistic view point, it works really well. It’s fresh and energetic, has plenty of movement and most importantly, it isn’t between the lines. He is at a stage where he isn’t worried about it being perfect. He doesn’t care about lines, its about making his marks and the pear looks fantastic for it. He doesn’t put boundaries around his expression. He just goes for it and all kids his age do. (Not just a over proud parent…)The creatively rock and roll. parajumpers soldes We are all born naturally creative and for many people, it goes down hill from there. I think that the moment we start getting taught to keep between the lines, we start to stifle our creativity and the slippery slope starts. Mens Belstaff Leather & Shearling Kids suddenly start worrying about mistakes, stop taking risks, judge ourselves on the output rather than the process, lose the ability to play and generally tighten up the creative sphincter! Picasso talks of you spend the first 7 years of your life painting like a child then the rest of your life trying to paint like a child. I think to many of us then go on to live our life between the lines. 2017 Winter Clothing No risk, worrying to much about mistakes, not playing, not expressing who you are, not enjoying the moment and squashing our wonderful imagination and creativity. SO, dont live between the lines and DEFENITELY don’t colour between the...

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